• Part 01:
    Current projects and work in progress

  • Part 02:
    Papers and reports

    • Chapter 04:
      2017

      • The Daffodil, the Rose and the Hibiscus: exploring diversity in ministry
        Ermal Kirby

        Ermal Kirby presents an overview of the initial findings of his research project exploring diversity in ministry across cultures

        Ermal Kirby presents an overview of the initial findings of his research project exploring diversity in ministry across cultures

    • Chapter 03:
      2016

      • Beyond the Box:Diversity, mediation and new models of demographic data profiling
        Christopher Stephens and Lia Dong Shimada

        Abstract of an article published in Mediation Theory and Practice journal

        Christopher Stephens and Lia Dong Shimada have been looking at how demographic data is collected for monitoring purposes. The article, whose abstract is published here, is the outcome of some research in the College of Mediators (alongside other, Methodist contexts). Insights gained as a result of the research have  had an impact on the College’s policy and practice and associated training.

      • Communities of Practice
        Megan Seneque, Chris Bond & Sue Miller

        SWF's work with the Methodist Church's Discipleship & Ministries Learning Network ( DMLN )

        The Susanna Wesley Foundation has been working with the Discipleship & Ministries Learning Network (DMLN). The DMLN is the body within the Methodist Church which is tasked with supporting, equipping and resourcing the Church to become a transformed and transforming community through its nurture and provision of formation, learning and development in the Church. SWF’s project – in the form of action learning – has involved helping to build communities of practice as a vehicle for transforming culture and practice in the Network, and, through this, in the Network’s various local contexts.

        SWF has worked with teams and officers in the Network in order to orient them to a particular way of being in their service to local communities. The work has involved exemplifying a participatory approach and inviting co-ownership of vision and strategy using various social processes to shift the culture to one which is transformational rather than transactional.

        Alongside this collaborative work ( carried out by Megan Seneque, accompanied by Sue Miller) research was conducted by Chris Bond to explore the perceptions and experiences of officers of the network. This research was carried out in parallel with the action learning project and was used to inform the project. The report published here discusses both strands of work.

      • Learning from Practice in Ministerial Formation
        Luke Curran

        This paper reports on a project commissioned by the Methodist Church in order to gain 'insights from the experiences of practice-based formation and training in the churches and the professions'

        The project, carried out by Luke Curran (former Senior Methodist/Oversight tutor at St Michael’s College, Llandaff and Director of the Methodist Church in Wales Training Network) explored how practice enables those in initial ministerial training (IMT) for the Methodist Church to prepare for ministry. This primary research question was supported by four subsidiary questions:

        • How does practice in IMT enable the creation of knowledge (both for the individual and the wider community of practice)?
        • How does practice in IMT enable learning?
        • How does practice in IMT enable formation?
        • What are the key learning points for the development of the Methodist Church’s new learning pathway – the Circuit Based Learning Programme?

        In answering these questions the research used various sources, including recent published work and consultations on practice-based initial ministerial training. It reviewed various programmes and activities, including practice-based training in different professions (nursing, social work and teaching) and non-Methodist practice-based programmes for ministerial training, as well as previous Methodist initiatives including In-Service Training (IST) and the College Circuit Training Programme (CCTP). It also looked at the role of practice in Methodist Local Preacher Training. Alongside this, the place of practice in the history of ministerial development was explored.

        This report will help to inform the development of the Methodist Church’s new learning pathway. It is also hoped that the project’s findings and insights will be shared more widely, since they have relevance for pieces of work within the Discipleship & Ministries Learning Network, particularly in relation to building communities of practice and the development of learning relationships.

      • Women and Leadership: a review of literature from the education sector
        Anthony Thorpe

        This paper draws on a large body of literature from education settings and highlights some findings around women's representation and the exercise of leadership.

        There is much shared history between churches and educational institutions including the people who work in them, those for whom they have a special concern and their missions to serve the wider community and promote social cohesion. Many Christian organizations, including the Methodist Church, have indicated a wish to look further at women in leadership in the church and the issue of under-represented groups in leadership (for example, Green, 2014; Jones, 2015; Methodist Church, 2002, 2003, 2005), and the education sector has been concerned with this matter with increasing interest over the past couple of decades (Coleman, 2012; Ozga, 1993). Yet whilst reports from both sectors contain exhortations to ‘make things better’, ways forward seem less easy to implement and the same experiences and frustrations often re-emerge in research across the decades (Coate et al., 2015).

        This review of the literature mainly from education settings explores the terrain of women in leadership and management in order to extract useful insights. It asks what thwarts these good intentions and how a more inclusive leadership might be achieved by exploring four major themes:

        i) the representation of women within the leadership structures
        ii) where women are represented within the structures,
        iii) how leadership is exercised by women
        iv) the place of leadership development

      • Women and Leadership: a review of literature from the education sector – Executive Summary
        Anthony Thorpe

        A summary setting out the key findings from a review of the literature around women and leadership in education settings

        This executive summary paper sets out the main findings from an extensive literature review on women in leadership in education settings and focuses on four themes: the representation of women within the leadership structures; where women are represented within the structures; how leadership is exercised; and the place of leadership development. It highlights some key literature, and makes some recommendations for further research which may have relevance for the Church.

    • Chapter 02:
      2015

      • A critique of equality and diversity research and practice
        Anne-marie Greene

        A critique of key debates and developments in equality and diversity research and a consideration of their relevance for the Churches.

        A series of powerpoint slides looking at the key debates ad developments in the academic field of equality and diversity research, questioning the relevance, appropriateness and applicability of conventional theories and concepts for church and faith-based organisations.

      • Canon Law and Episcopal Authority
        Christopher Stephens

        Written by the Director of the Susanna Wesley Foundation and published by Oxford University Press.

         

        Canon Law and Episcopal Authority: The Canons of Antioch and Serdica

        In 2015 Christopher Stephens, Director of SWF, celebrated the publication by OUP of his book,  ‘Canon Law and Episcopal Authority’. The book combines the study of doctrinal development and institutional history and argues that, through studying the laws of the Church, we can see that power struggles between leading clerics and questions of the relative authority of different people and cities characterised the developing institutional Church and both overshadowed and influenced the development of doctrine. While the book focused on the Church in Late Antiquity, it raises issues which continue to be of relevance to the Church and which cause us to question how far theological positioning can mask more human concerns around power, law and institutional development. For those who value the long history of the Church as a tool for understanding the present, the book offers interesting propositions for the study of today’s Churches and suggests that organisational development and leadership – matters which are at the heart of SWF’s research themes – should always be considered critical to a proper understanding of the Church.

        For more information click on the link below:

        https://global.oup.com/academic/product/canon-law-and-episcopal-authority-9780198732228?cc=gb&lang=en&

      • The Cost of a Calling – Research Findings of Women in the Methodist Church and Church of England
        Anne-marie Greene

        The Cost of a Calling - Research Findings of Women in the Methodist Church and Church of England.

        A series of powerpoint slides looking at the experiences of women’s ministry in the Methodist Church and Church of England. It explores the cost of, and sacrifices made, within this calling, the perceptions and discriminations encountered by women in their vocation and the denominational differences affecting this ministry.

      • Women in leadership in Methodism: a historical approach
        Margaret Jones

        A paper looking at the history of women in leadership in Methodism, focusing particularly on the period from 1850.

        The paper argues that Methodist history suggests that the denomination and its offshoots are well placed to offer leadership opportunities to women. Women were prominent in Methodism’s early history, in the eighteenth century, and this paper examines the later history in the light of this ‘early Methodist baseline’, highlighting the key changes over the ensuing two centuries. It seeks to identify some of the factors that led to change and examines the extent to which the significant involvement of women in leadership may be held to have persisted. The paper concludes by posing some questions which emerge out of the author’s conversations with those currently, or recently, in key leadership roles within the Methodist Connexion.

    • Chapter 01:
      2014 and earlier

      • An evaluation of a complexities approach to consultancy and the management of change within Methodist churches and circuits
        Rodney Hill

        A paper which traces a personal journey through various stages of thinking about, and working with, organisations and churches, culminating in one which embraces a complexities approach.

        Rodney Hill draws out the experiences that have led to his increasing use of a complexities approach in consultancy as a Mission Enabler in the Methodist Church. He explores how he has come to develop an approach to church and circuit development that is essentially non-linear and conversational and which involves developing ‘healthy churches and circuits’ rather than focussing on targets for growth. This is the approach which Rodney has used in his work over the past five years in the Liverpool District and, latterly, in the Manchester and Stockport district. The paper begins to evaluate the limitations and strengths of that approach, which have informed the development of a new review tool for churches.

      • Creed or greed: what can the church learn from businesses founded on principles of faith? Part 1
        Nicholas Mayhew-Smith

        A paper looking at whether the church has anything to learn from the business world.

        This, the first of two papers looking at what the church can learn from businesses which have been founded on principles of faith, provides a theological and historical overview of faith-based businesses.

      • Creed or greed: what can the church learn from businesses founded on principles of faith? Part 2
        Nicholas Mayhew-Smith

        The second of two papers looking at what the church can learn from businesses which have been founded on principles of faith.

        This second paper on the subject of what the church can learn from businesses founded on principles of faith explores cooperative business models and traces the rise of the incorporated company. It looks at the emergence of Christian entrepreneurs and associated paternalistic models of management, and considers the place of Quaker businesses and of social enterprise, using various case studies as illustration.

      • Embodied approaches to management – incarnation as organisation
        Charity Hamilton

        A paper exploring the relationship between embodiment and incarnation and their relevance to organisation and management.

        Feminist, liberation and black theology have all used embodiment as a way of understanding and articulating the struggles of being and becoming. This paper explores the relationship between embodiment and incarnation whilst providing some possible links to organisation and management.

        The possibility of becoming is set in the context of the body and mirrors the theology of incarnation which places the emphasis on bodily creation, bodily living, bodily death and bodily resurrection. This paper argues that the body is the very space, the very separation and connection which offers not just the possibility of becoming but which is inherently divine purely because it is created flesh. Organisation as body or inhabited embodiment may be able to offer an insight into incarnation and conversely incarnation may be able to inform management as bodily self care; thus negotiating embodiment as central to all praxis and all divinity.

      • Leadership for public service: working with notions of co-creation of leadership and management roles
        Christopher Bond

        Drawing on data gathered from a study with Methodist presbyters, the paper offers an alternative leadership approach to that which is dominant in public service contexts.

        The paper proposes a model of leadership and management in public service roles based on the concept of co-creation as an alternative to current dominant approaches in in public service contexts that are largely shaped and influenced by ideologies associated with New Public Management (NPM). The paper sets out three main criticisms and challenges of NPM and the distorting effect that it can have by privileging individualising rather than socialising effects of governance. It then explores co-creation as an approach to management and leadership using data gathered from a two year study of leadership and management with Methodist presbyters. Finally, a model is presented which is developed further in the rest of the paper. The model proposed offers an alternative approach to governance, leadership and management in sectors such as education, health and local government, all of which currently appear to be suffering from a crisis of leadership.

      • Methodism, ministers and management
        Yvonne Guerrier and Christopher Bond

        A paper looking at how far presbyters think of themselves as managers - research which pre-dated the formation of the Foundation and has influenced its development.

        A paper arising out of research funded by the Southlands Methodist Trust which explores questions around the professional identities of ministers. It considers the orientation of Methodist presbyters towards leadership and management based on a series of interviews with presbyters, lay employees and lay volunteers.

      • Ministry and Management: Convergence, Divergence and Prospects
        Tim Harle

        Tim Harle's paper from the Foundation's first conference 'Ministry and management: God and mammon?' setting the scene for future work around ministry, management and organisation.

        This paper was written by Tim Harle at the invitation of the Susanna Wesley Foundation to help map out the territory around ministry, management and organisation. It covers a range of disciplines – from social sciences and organisation studies to theology and ecclesiology – and aims to prompt interdisciplinary conversations that will lead to learning and change. It includes bibliographic information, which aims to demonstrate breadth without compromising depth. The main focus is on the last half-century, although the ancient wisdom embodied in recent thinking is hopefully recognisable…but the ultimate focus in on the current situation and opportunities for the future.

      • Professionalism and the Church
        Christopher Stephens

        A paper exploring the potential for interaction between 'secular' business models and the life and work of the churches - setting the scene for subsequent work.

        This paper seeks to demonstrate and explore a range of perspectives, ideas and materials that might encourage discussion around the interaction of “secular‟ business models, processes and practices, which might be defined as the modern professional approach to work, with the life and work of the Church (and churches). It looks at some scholarly trends, theories and opinions, historical developments and modern practical examples from Church and secular business contexts to demonstrate some of the breadth of thought and experience in this area and to propose some helpful approaches to the issue. It ends by posing questions and areas for further conversation that might emerge from the material contained in the preceding pages.

         

      • Research, practice and the professional Christian minister
        Stephen Skuce

        A paper looking at the potential contribution of professional doctorates to Christian ministry.

        The paper, presented at the Foundation’s conference, ‘Ministry and management: God and mammon?’, considers the role of professional doctorates in enabling research which is focused on professional practice and the importance of such doctorates in enabling practice-based outcomes alongside contributions to scholarship. The development of the Cliff College Professional Doctorate (PhD in Missiology) is used as a case study to illustrate this.

      • Responses of Methodist ministers to ministerial development review: a case for research-led policy-making
        Mark Wakelin

        Drawing on the responses of Methodist ministers to the policy of ministerial development review, a case is made for research-led policy making.

        The paper examines the responses of Methodist ministers to the policy of ministerial development review (MDR). A case is made for research-led policy making; of how important it is for the Church t pay attention to those affected by a policy, and to seek understanding of their responses from organisation perspectives. The research takes up themes from previous research by Yvonne Guerrier and Christopher Bond (Guerrier, 2012, Guerrier and Bond, 2013, Guerrier and Bond, 2014.) The findings confirm some of those identified in this previous work, indicating complex feelings and thoughts around perceived managerial tasks. There is evidence of some difficulty with the language of management and a wide breadth of opinion about MDR, its value and helpfulness. The relationship between individual ministers and the ‘national’ Church also presents some issues in terms of identity and reflects a particular understanding of the Covenant relationship. The data shows an inconsistent and wide variety of approaches to how work priorities are set and the extent to which support is provided, underlining some of the reasoning behind the introduction of the policy in the first place. The need for policy makers to find ways of noticing how their policies impact on the lives they seek to support and help is recommended.

         

  • Part 03:
    Conferences and events

    • Chapter 07:
      Changing Church, Sept 2017

      Materials from the insightful, action-orientated conference

      • Case study 1
        Keith Elford

        The Sisters of Nazareth - restructuring an organization for sustainability

        Keith Elford reflects on working with the Sisters of Nazareth, a Roman Catholic Religious Order, assessing and implementing a change process.

      • Case study 2
        Siôn Rhys Evans

        The Diocese of Bangor - changing church for today's context

        Siôn Rhys Evans describes how the Diocese of Bangor explored changes to make the church “fit for purpose” in today’s cultural context.

      • Case study 3
        Colin Ride

        Aire & Calder circuit - adapting church structure to maximise resources

        Colin Ride explains the process by which a new Methodist circuit was created out of four in the Leeds District.

      • Case study 4
        Anna Ruddick

        The Eden Network - unintended change in urban ministry

        Anna Ruddick presents the outcomes of a qualitative research project exploring relationships between Eden team members and members of their urban communities.

      • Case study 5
        Megan Seneque

        Catholic Earthcare Australia - shifting the focus of an organization

        Megan Seneque reflects on assisting Earthcare with conceptualizing and implementing a strategy to broaden their focus.

      • Case study 6
        Esther Stevenson

        Christian Aid - from 'them and us' to 'we'; reviewing internal leadership and management

        Esther Stevenson describes working with Christian Aid to review and change internal leadership and management practices.

      • Conference Paper 1
        Gary Hall

        Metanoia Precedes Management: reflections on theological learning, radical passivity, and the urge to organize

        Gary Hall reflects on “creatively disruptive” theological learning in community.

      • Conference paper 2
        David Dickinson

        Changing Perceptions: literature and church

        David Dickinson presents some sources from literature that facilitate thinking about change in a church context.

    • Chapter 06:
      Migration & Ministry Sept 2016

      A successful, thought-provoking day. The opening and closing plenary sessions, along with selected reflections from the conference, can be viewed below.

      • 1_Opening Plenary
        Christine Elliott

        Contemporary Lenses

        To view the introduction to the Opening Plenary session chaired by Christine Elliot please select the Read icon located at the top right hand corner

        opening-plenary-christine-elliott-photograph

      • 2_Opening Plenary
        Harvey Kwiyani

        Opening Plenary

        To view Harvey Kwiyani’s contribution to the Opening Plenary please select the Read icon located at the top right hand corner

         

         

      • 3_Opening Plenary
        Susanna Synder

        Fear, Fatigue and Flourishing - A Few Questions and Thoughts

        To listen to Susanna Snyder’s contribution to the Opening Plenary please choose the Read icon located at the top right hand corner

         

        opening-plenary-susanna-snyder-photograph

      • 4_Opening Plenary
        Inderjit Bhogal

        Opening Plenary

        To view Inderjit Bhogal’s contribution to the Opening Plenary  please select the Read icon located at the top right hand corner

         

        opening-plenary-inderjit-bhogal-photograph

      • 5_Closing Plenary
        Lucy Berry

        Closing Poems

        To view Lucy Berry’s contribution to the Closing Plenary please select the Read option located at the top right hand corner

         

        closing-plenary-closing-poems-lucy-berry-photograph

      • 6_Closing Plenary
        Ric Stott

        Art Installation: Triptych

        Art Installation:Triptych by Ric Stott

        To view the introduction given by Ric Stott, together with Firas and and Pride from the City of Sanctuary ( Sheffield), please choose the Read icon located at the top right hand corner

        closing-plenary-art-installation-triptych-ric-scott-photograph

         

        closing-plenary-art-installation-triptych-firas-photograph

         

        closing-plenary-art-installation-triptych-pride-photograph

      • 7_Closing Plenary
        Janice Price

        Stories of Migration in Word and Image

        To view Janice Price’s contribution to the Closing Plenary please select the Read icon located at the top right hand corner

         

        closing-plenary-janice-price-photograph

      • Reflections from the Migration and Ministry Conference
        Ermal Kirby

        Migration and Ministry: re-aligning perspectives and practices

        A reflection from the Migration and Ministry Conference can be viewed by choosing the Read icon located to your right.

      • Reflections from the Migration and Ministry Conference
        Paul Nzacahayo and Rachel Starr

        Bible study resource: 'Theology, Migration and Place'

        These reflections from the Migration and Ministry Conference can be viewed by choosing the Read icon located to your right.

      • Reflections from the Migration and Ministry Conference
        Tank Green

        Notting Hill Methodist Church: 'race relations' in the 1960s

        A reflection from the Migration and Ministry Conference can be viewed by choosing the Read icon located to your right.

      • Reflections from the Migration and Ministry Conference
        Vaughan Jones

        Pastoral Theology and Diaspora Community

        A reflection from the Migration and Ministry Conference can be viewed by choosing the Read icon located to your right.

    • Chapter 03:
      The Susanna Wesley Foundation: Reconciling ministry and management? Nov 2015

      Session for Roehampton's Research Group in Ministerial Theology

      • Sue Miller

        Workshop slides and conversation starters

        To view the slides press the download icon

    • Chapter 05:
      When God is a participant in the employment relationship June 2016

      Paper delivered to the 2016 conference of the British Universities Industrial Relations Association ( BUIRA) in Leeds

      • Anne-marie Greene, Sue Miller & Mark Wakelin

        Reflections on the performance appraisal process in the Methodist Church- slides from the presentation

        To view the slides please press the download icon

    • Chapter 04:
      Why we do what we do the way we do April 2016

      Workshop held for Methodist ministers and lay leaders looking at organisational models of church and their influence on how we approach change.

      • Keith Elford

        Workshop slides

        To view this Powerpoint presentation please click the Download icon

    • Chapter 02:
      Gender Diversity Leadership June 2015

      Papers arising out the Foundation's conference 'Gender Diversity Leadership'.

      • A critique of equality and diversity research and practice
        Anne-marie Greene

        A critique of key debates and developments in equality and diversity research and a consideration of their relevance for the Churches.

        A series of powerpoint slides looking at the key debates ad developments in the academic field of equality and diversity research, questioning the relevance, appropriateness and applicability of conventional theories and concepts for church and faith-based organisations.

      • Flier for ‘Gender Diversity Leadership’

        The flier which was used to advertise the Foundation’s second conference –‘Gender Diversity Leadership’, June 2015.

        The Foundation’s second conference focused on areas and issues which constitute a significant strand of SWF’s work. Diversity in ministry, and inclusion and participation, are key areas of the Foundation’s research activity.

      • The Cost of a Calling – Research Findings of Women in the Methodist Church and Church of England
        Anne-marie Greene

        The Cost of a Calling - Research Findings of Women in the Methodist Church and Church of England.

        A series of powerpoint slides looking at the experiences of women’s ministry in the Methodist Church and Church of England. It explores the cost of, and sacrifices made, within this calling, the perceptions and discriminations encountered by women in their vocation and the denominational differences affecting this ministry.

      • Women in leadership in Methodism: a historical approach
        Margaret Jones

        A paper looking at the history of women in leadership in Methodism, focusing particularly on the period from 1850.

        The paper argues that Methodist history suggests that the denomination and its offshoots are well placed to offer leadership opportunities to women. Women were prominent in Methodism’s early history, in the eighteenth century, and this paper examines the later history in the light of this ‘early Methodist baseline’, highlighting the key changes over the ensuing two centuries. It seeks to identify some of the factors that led to change and examines the extent to which the significant involvement of women in leadership may be held to have persisted. The paper concludes by posing some questions which emerge out of the author’s conversations with those currently, or recently, in key leadership roles within the Methodist Connexion.

    • Chapter 01:
      Ministry & management: God and mammon? Sept 2014

      Papers arising out of the Foundation's first conference.

      • An evaluation of a complexities approach to consultancy and the management of change within Methodist churches and circuits
        Rodney Hill

        A paper which traces a personal journey through various stages of thinking about, and working with, organisations and churches, culminating in one which embraces a complexities approach.

        Rodney Hill draws out the experiences that have led to his increasing use of a complexities approach in consultancy as a Mission Enabler in the Methodist Church. He explores how he has come to develop an approach to church and circuit development that is essentially non-linear and conversational and which involves developing ‘healthy churches and circuits’ rather than focussing on targets for growth. This is the approach which Rodney has used in his work over the past five years in the Liverpool District and, latterly, in the Manchester and Stockport district. The paper begins to evaluate the limitations and strengths of that approach, which have informed the development of a new review tool for churches.

      • Creed or greed: what can the church learn from businesses founded on principles of faith? Part 1
        Nicholas Mayhew-Smith

        A paper looking at whether the church has anything to learn from the business world.

        This, the first of two papers looking at what the church can learn from businesses which have been founded on principles of faith, provides a theological and historical overview of faith-based businesses.

      • Creed or greed: what can the church learn from businesses founded on principles of faith? Part 2
        Nicholas Mayhew-Smith

        The second of two papers looking at what the church can learn from businesses which have been founded on principles of faith.

        This second paper on the subject of what the church can learn from businesses founded on principles of faith explores cooperative business models and traces the rise of the incorporated company. It looks at the emergence of Christian entrepreneurs and associated paternalistic models of management, and considers the place of Quaker businesses and of social enterprise, using various case studies as illustration.

      • Embodied approaches to management – incarnation as organisation
        Charity Hamilton

        A paper exploring the relationship between embodiment and incarnation and their relevance to organisation and management.

        Feminist, liberation and black theology have all used embodiment as a way of understanding and articulating the struggles of being and becoming. This paper explores the relationship between embodiment and incarnation whilst providing some possible links to organisation and management.

        The possibility of becoming is set in the context of the body and mirrors the theology of incarnation which places the emphasis on bodily creation, bodily living, bodily death and bodily resurrection. This paper argues that the body is the very space, the very separation and connection which offers not just the possibility of becoming but which is inherently divine purely because it is created flesh. Organisation as body or inhabited embodiment may be able to offer an insight into incarnation and conversely incarnation may be able to inform management as bodily self care; thus negotiating embodiment as central to all praxis and all divinity.

      • Flier for ‘Ministry & management: God & mammon?’

        The flier which was used to advertise the Foundation’s first conference‘ - Ministry & management: God & mammon?’ – which took place in September 2014.

        The publicity for the Foundation’s conference highlights a number of the themes, tensions and inter-relationships which SWF seeks to explore in its work.

         

      • Leadership for public service: working with notions of co-creation of leadership and management roles
        Christopher Bond

        Drawing on data gathered from a study with Methodist presbyters, the paper offers an alternative leadership approach to that which is dominant in public service contexts.

        The paper proposes a model of leadership and management in public service roles based on the concept of co-creation as an alternative to current dominant approaches in in public service contexts that are largely shaped and influenced by ideologies associated with New Public Management (NPM). The paper sets out three main criticisms and challenges of NPM and the distorting effect that it can have by privileging individualising rather than socialising effects of governance. It then explores co-creation as an approach to management and leadership using data gathered from a two year study of leadership and management with Methodist presbyters. Finally, a model is presented which is developed further in the rest of the paper. The model proposed offers an alternative approach to governance, leadership and management in sectors such as education, health and local government, all of which currently appear to be suffering from a crisis of leadership.

      • Ministry and Management: Convergence, Divergence and Prospects
        Tim Harle

        Tim Harle's paper from the Foundation's first conference 'Ministry and management: God and mammon?' setting the scene for future work around ministry, management and organisation.

        This paper was written by Tim Harle at the invitation of the Susanna Wesley Foundation to help map out the territory around ministry, management and organisation. It covers a range of disciplines – from social sciences and organisation studies to theology and ecclesiology – and aims to prompt interdisciplinary conversations that will lead to learning and change. It includes bibliographic information, which aims to demonstrate breadth without compromising depth. The main focus is on the last half-century, although the ancient wisdom embodied in recent thinking is hopefully recognisable…but the ultimate focus in on the current situation and opportunities for the future.

      • Research, practice and the professional Christian minister
        Stephen Skuce

        A paper looking at the potential contribution of professional doctorates to Christian ministry.

        The paper, presented at the Foundation’s conference, ‘Ministry and management: God and mammon?’, considers the role of professional doctorates in enabling research which is focused on professional practice and the importance of such doctorates in enabling practice-based outcomes alongside contributions to scholarship. The development of the Cliff College Professional Doctorate (PhD in Missiology) is used as a case study to illustrate this.

      • Responses of Methodist ministers to ministerial development review: a case for research-led policy-making
        Mark Wakelin

        Drawing on the responses of Methodist ministers to the policy of ministerial development review, a case is made for research-led policy making.

        The paper examines the responses of Methodist ministers to the policy of ministerial development review (MDR). A case is made for research-led policy making; of how important it is for the Church t pay attention to those affected by a policy, and to seek understanding of their responses from organisation perspectives. The research takes up themes from previous research by Yvonne Guerrier and Christopher Bond (Guerrier, 2012, Guerrier and Bond, 2013, Guerrier and Bond, 2014.) The findings confirm some of those identified in this previous work, indicating complex feelings and thoughts around perceived managerial tasks. There is evidence of some difficulty with the language of management and a wide breadth of opinion about MDR, its value and helpfulness. The relationship between individual ministers and the ‘national’ Church also presents some issues in terms of identity and reflects a particular understanding of the Covenant relationship. The data shows an inconsistent and wide variety of approaches to how work priorities are set and the extent to which support is provided, underlining some of the reasoning behind the introduction of the policy in the first place. The need for policy makers to find ways of noticing how their policies impact on the lives they seek to support and help is recommended.

         

  • Part 04:
    Resources and toolkits

    Resources relating to a number of areas are in development or will follow the completion of longer term projects.